25 Things to Say Instead of “Does That Make Sense?”

In the world of business communication, clarity and mutual understanding are paramount. Yet, asking “Does that make sense?” can sometimes come across as either condescending or self-doubting. It implies either that the audience might not be sharp enough to understand or that you, as the speaker, are not clear in your communication.

To navigate this delicate balance, it is essential to phrase your queries for clarification in a way that is respectful, engaging, and conducive to productive dialogue. This article explores 25 alternative phrases to “Does that make sense?” and delves into when and why each is most appropriate.

What to Say Instead of “Does That Make Sense?”: 25 Ideas

what to say instead of does that make sense

1. “I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.”

“I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. It’s important to me that the concept is not only understood but also resonates with you.”

This phrase invites feedback in a way that values the listener’s opinion. It is ideal in collaborative settings where you want to encourage a two-way dialogue and show that you value the perspective of your audience.

2. “How do you feel about what I’ve just outlined?”

“How do you feel about what I’ve just outlined? Your insights could help refine these ideas further.”

This question is particularly useful when you are looking for more than just confirmation of understanding. It opens the floor for emotional and intellectual responses, making it great for discussions that require buy-in or consensus.

3. “Could you please share your perspective on this?”

“Could you please share your perspective on this? Understanding your viewpoint is crucial for us to move forward effectively.”

This approach is respectful and acknowledges the value of the listener’s viewpoint. It’s particularly effective in a team environment where each member’s input is vital.

4. “Is there anything I can clarify further?”

“Is there anything I can clarify further? I want to ensure that every aspect is clear and comprehensible.”

This phrase is a direct and open invitation for questions. It’s most suitable when you’ve presented complex or detailed information and want to make sure nothing is misunderstood.

5. “What are your initial reactions to this?”

“What are your initial reactions to this? Immediate feedback will help in assessing if the concept is on the right track.”

This prompt is great for gauging initial responses. It’s particularly useful in brainstorming sessions or when presenting a new idea, as it encourages instinctive feedback.

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6. “Do you need more details on any part of this?”

“Do you need more details on any part of this? I’m here to provide further information if required.”

This is an inclusive way to ask if anyone needs more information. It’s particularly useful in educational or training scenarios where comprehension is key.

7. “I’m curious to know how you interpret this.”

“I’m curious to know how you interpret this. Your interpretation will help us see if the message is being conveyed as intended.”

This phrase encourages the listener to share their understanding. It’s useful in creative or strategic discussions where individual interpretation can provide valuable insights.

8. “Let’s pause for a moment. Any questions or comments?”

“Let’s pause for a moment. Any questions or comments? This pause will give us a chance to address any uncertainties immediately.”

This approach is direct and gives a clear invitation for questions or feedback. It’s ideal in presentations or meetings where you want to encourage immediate responses.

9. “How does this align with your understanding?”

“How does this align with your understanding? It’s crucial that we are on the same page before moving forward.”

Asking for alignment instead of understanding shows respect for the listener’s intellect. It’s especially effective in collaborative projects or strategic planning.

10. “Would you like me to go over any of this again?”

“Would you like me to go over any of this again? Sometimes, revisiting a point can bring more clarity.”

This is a considerate way to offer a recap. It’s most suitable in educational or training settings, or when you have presented complex information.

11. “Are there any aspects that you’d like to discuss more?”

“Are there any aspects that you’d like to discuss more? Your questions can provide valuable insights for everyone.”

This phrase encourages deeper exploration of specific topics. It’s ideal in meetings or discussions where detailed understanding is crucial.

12. “I want to make sure we’re in sync. What are your thoughts?”

“I want to make sure we’re in sync. What are your thoughts? This will help us ensure that we are moving forward together.”

Here, the focus is on alignment and teamwork. It’s particularly effective in collaborative environments where collective understanding is the goal.

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13. “Let me know if I should elaborate on any point.”

“Let me know if I should elaborate on any point. Your feedback is important to ensure the clarity of the discussion.”

This phrase is accommodating and shows that you are open to providing more information as needed. It’s great in any setting where you want to be approachable and helpful.

14. “I’m here to answer any questions you may have.”

“I’m here to answer any questions you may have. Feel free to ask anything that might help you understand the topic better.”

This is a welcoming and open-ended offer for questions. It’s suitable in a variety of settings, from formal presentations to informal discussions.

15. “Do you see any gaps in what I’ve presented?”

“Do you see any gaps in what I’ve presented? Identifying any missing pieces will help in making the information more complete and robust.”

Asking about gaps invites a critical review, which is useful in situations where thorough understanding and detail are important.

16. “Is this in line with what you were expecting?”

“Is this in line with what you were expecting? Understanding your expectations will help in tailoring the message more effectively.”

This is a good way to check if the information meets the listener’s expectations or preconceived notions. It’s especially useful in client meetings or project briefings.

17. “I’d appreciate your input on this.”

“I’d appreciate your input on this. Your feedback will not only confirm understanding but also enrich the discussion.”

This approach values the listener’s contribution and is ideal in collaborative settings where everyone’s input is valued.

18. “Let’s ensure we have a shared understanding here. Your views?”

“Let’s ensure we have a shared understanding here. Your views? This helps in confirming that we are all on the same track.”

Focusing on shared understanding promotes a team-oriented approach. It’s great in work environments where collective comprehension is key.

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19. “I’m keen to know if this resonates with you.”

“I’m keen to know if this resonates with you. Resonance is as important as understanding in ensuring that the message is impactful.”

This phrase is useful when you’re not just looking for comprehension but also for emotional or intellectual engagement with the idea.

20. “Could I provide more clarity on this?”

“Could I provide more clarity on this? Sometimes, additional details can make a concept more comprehensible.”

This is a humble and helpful way to offer more information. It’s particularly appropriate in training sessions or when explaining new concepts.

21. “Are we aligned on this?”

“Are we aligned on this? Alignment is key to moving forward successfully in any project or plan.”

Asking for alignment is a concise way to check for understanding and agreement. It’s effective in team meetings and project discussions.

22. “I hope this is clear, but I’m happy to explain further.”

“I hope this is clear, but I’m happy to explain further. Ensuring clarity is crucial for me.”

This phrase is polite and shows a willingness to provide additional information. It’s suitable in any setting where you want to be helpful and clear.

23. “Do you have any thoughts or questions on this topic?”

“Do you have any thoughts or questions on this topic? Engaging in a dialogue can often bring more clarity and depth to the subject.”

This is an open invitation for thoughts and questions. It’s great for interactive sessions where the aim is to encourage discussion and deeper understanding.

24. “I’d be interested to hear how you’re processing this information.”

“I’d be interested to hear how you’re processing this information. Your processing and interpretation can provide unique perspectives.”

This phrase encourages the listener to share their process of understanding, which can provide insights into how the information is being received.

25. “Let’s take a moment to discuss any unclear points.”

“Let’s take a moment to discuss any unclear points. This will ensure that everyone has a clear understanding before we proceed.”

This is a proactive approach to address any uncertainties. It’s especially useful in meetings or workshops where clarity is essential for progress.